Community trainings – WWIRR http://wwirr.com/ Fri, 05 Aug 2022 21:15:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://wwirr.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-48-120x120.png Community trainings – WWIRR http://wwirr.com/ 32 32 🌱 Sandy Springs Sidewalk Access to MARTA + PD Up Shooter Trainings https://wwirr.com/%f0%9f%8c%b1-sandy-springs-sidewalk-access-to-marta-pd-up-shooter-trainings/ Thu, 04 Aug 2022 21:59:11 +0000 https://wwirr.com/%f0%9f%8c%b1-sandy-springs-sidewalk-access-to-marta-pd-up-shooter-trainings/ Hello everyone! It’s me, Danielle Fallon-O’Leary, your Daily host. Here are all the most important things to know about what’s happening locally. 📣 Our readers love to celebrate good news! You can now shout your big announcement at the top of the Atlanta Daily newsletter. Whether it’s a grand opening, new product for sale, birthday, […]]]>

Hello everyone! It’s me, Danielle Fallon-O’Leary, your Daily host. Here are all the most important things to know about what’s happening locally.


📣 Our readers love to celebrate good news! You can now shout your big announcement at the top of the Atlanta Daily newsletter. Whether it’s a grand opening, new product for sale, birthday, anniversary, engagement, wedding or new baby, let everyone celebrate at your side! Submit your ad here.


Now, today’s weather:

A thunderstorm around the afternoon High: 89 Low: 73.


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Here are the top five stories from today in Atlanta:

  • You may be eligible for free school meals in your district. You can apply in Fulton County here. All families are encouraged to apply as it can also help cover academic expenses such as internet access or college application fee waivers. (11Alive.com WXIA)
  • Here are four single-family homes available in the Atlanta area. The houses available range from $450,000 to $850,000 and all have at least 2 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms. (We were especially charmed by the beautiful walkway leading to the Niles Ave House!) (Atlanta Patch)
  • Best Friends in Atlanta has announced a Clear the Shelters event and will be waiving the August 6 adoption fee at the end of the month. You can scroll through the abundance of options available here. (CBS 46 News)

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Danielle Fallon-O’Leary

About me: Danielle Fallon-O’Leary is a senior writer at content creation agency Lightning Media Partners and assists Patch.com with the management of the community newsletter. Danielle also has a Masters in Communication Science and Disorders and works part-time as a pediatric speech therapist.

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Radford authorities participate in active threat training https://wwirr.com/radford-authorities-participate-in-active-threat-training/ Sat, 30 Jul 2022 00:28:07 +0000 https://wwirr.com/radford-authorities-participate-in-active-threat-training/ RADFORD, Virginia. – The authorities prepare for the worst scenarios during these trainings. On Friday, the Radford City Police Department said it had been participating in active threat training throughout July, with more to follow soon. Pete Rutzinski, acting deputy police chief, said the trainings help authorities prepare while working on the ground. “The RCPD […]]]>

RADFORD, Virginia. – The authorities prepare for the worst scenarios during these trainings.

On Friday, the Radford City Police Department said it had been participating in active threat training throughout July, with more to follow soon.

Pete Rutzinski, acting deputy police chief, said the trainings help authorities prepare while working on the ground.

“The RCPD remains committed to training in the latest tactics, with the latest research and information,” Rutzinski said. “This allows our agency to be better prepared to protect and serve our community on a day-to-day basis and in the event of an active threat incident.”

The first two trainings were hosted by the National Center for Biomedical Research and Training/Academy of Counterterrorism Education at Louisiana State University, better known as LSU-NCBRT/ACE, according to the release.

The courses were developed by the LSU Center in conjunction with the nation’s top subject matter experts, the statement said, and are intended to meet the most current preparation needs.

A d

According to the release, Active Threat Integrated Response Care was the first training the City of Radford Police Department has participated in with Radford Fire and EMS, Radford Sheriff’s Department, Radford University Emergency Management Officers. and several surrounding jurisdictions.

The ATIRC course addressed the need for rapid and decisive communication between law enforcement, firefighters and emergency medical services in an active threat scenario, the statement said, and it provided crews with skills medical.

Not only that, but the course allowed crews to participate in practical exercises to help improve communication between teams at the scene, and underscored the end goal of saving more lives, according to the statement.

Authorities said there was also a second round of training that took the Active Threats Course on Campus, which was attended by members of Radford City Public Schools and Radford Public Safety officials. .

A d

The Radford City Police Department’s final round of training will take place on the weekday evening of August 1 at Radford High School, according to the release, and it will be “force on force” training.

Several agencies will participate in the final training, which could lead to an increased police presence in the area during these evenings, according to the release.

Copyright 2022 by WSLS 10 – All rights reserved.

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Guadalcanal conducts health promotion training in schools https://wwirr.com/guadalcanal-conducts-health-promotion-training-in-schools/ Thu, 28 Jul 2022 01:47:04 +0000 https://wwirr.com/guadalcanal-conducts-health-promotion-training-in-schools/ This initiative is part of a broader effort by the Ministry of Health to promote healthy living and lifestyle, with emphasis and attention on the prevention front. A dozen schools in Guadalcanal have received health training in the past two weeks, according to the Ministry of Health. The trainings covered healthy setting guidelines, including the […]]]>

This initiative is part of a broader effort by the Ministry of Health to promote healthy living and lifestyle, with emphasis and attention on the prevention front.

A dozen schools in Guadalcanal have received health training in the past two weeks, according to the Ministry of Health.

The trainings covered healthy setting guidelines, including the healthy school guideline. The guideline is to enable schools to map areas that need attention and action to ensure a healthy, safe and supportive learning environment for school children.

This initiative is part of a broader effort by the Ministry of Health to promote healthy living and lifestyle, with emphasis and attention on the prevention front.

The Director General of Health Promotion and National Coordinator of Healthy Environments, Mr Ben Rickie Kiokimo, explained that this approach is implemented by the Ministry of Health through its National Department of Health Promotion and provincial health services and its partners and stakeholders.

Guadalcanal Health Promotion Officer, Mr. Kelton Sikala, who is currently supporting the Healthy Settings program as lead facilitator, said participants should complete a baseline assessment of gaps in their environment and develop action plans. action to solve the identified problems.

“For example, at the Betivatu school, participants identified health and safety issues, including the need to strengthen behavior change communication to do personal hygiene activities such as washing hands after using the restroom and before eating a standard. They also identified the need to replace one of its buildings which has deteriorated and poses safety risks to students and staff,” explained Ms. Sikala.

He added that many other health and safety issues are identified which schools need to commit to addressing, some will require the support of education authorities, while most are within the purview of the schools themselves.

“It is the purpose of the training to enable teachers and school administrators to see for themselves the issues impacting student health and learning on school premises,” Mr. Sikala.

He also stressed that the importance of training is to improve health and well-being in the country.

“Therefore, we need to invest in holistic health settings at the school level, where children spend more time in the day and in a captive learning environment.

Health education should be integrated into the school curriculum, and also reflected in school administration and ethos, with strong community partnership and school-based health services,” stressed Mr Sikala.

Source: MHMS Media

Disclaimer: Solomon Times Online may edit or delete your comment and cannot guarantee that all submissions will be published or remain online. The comments expressed on these pages are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Solomon Times Online.

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Implicit bias training available to meet LARA – MHA requirements https://wwirr.com/implicit-bias-training-available-to-meet-lara-mha-requirements/ Wed, 27 Jul 2022 18:59:36 +0000 https://wwirr.com/implicit-bias-training-available-to-meet-lara-mha-requirements/ The Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs (LARA) revised the Public Health Code Rules requiring implicit bias training for all professions licensed or registered under the Public Health Code came into force in June. Implicit bias training is still available for those who need to meet the requirement. The Office for Health Equity and Inclusion […]]]>

The Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs (LARA) revised the Public Health Code Rules requiring implicit bias training for all professions licensed or registered under the Public Health Code came into force in June. Implicit bias training is still available for those who need to meet the requirement.

The Office for Health Equity and Inclusion – Michigan Medicine hosts Building Towards Belonging: Implicit Bias Training (Compliant LARA), a one-hour live virtual course.

Building Towards Belonging: Implicit Bias training is available for $150 per participant.

The following groups are entitled to a discount of $50 per person:

  • University of Michigan alumni and retirees
  • Non-profit workers
  • K-12 workers
  • Groups of 10+ (must be registered together)

If you fall into one of these categories, email OHEI-training@med.umich.edu and request a promo code for the category you qualify for.

Community group session rates: If your team has 50 participants or more, you can request a virtual session outside of our currently posted schedule. This session will be scheduled at a time convenient for your team and requests should be submitted within this form at least 6 to 8 weeks in advance.

The Michigan Board of Health also offers implicit bias training in two formats, hybrid or live guest lecture, over the next few months.

In a hybrid delivery model, learners will watch an hour-long on-demand video and attend an hour-long webinar to engage in in-depth discussion and group exercises with the instructor and other learners . This training is available for $50 per person. Register here.

With a guest presentation, organizations can offer the training to their staff on-site at their convenience. The presentation will include an introduction to implicit biases and focused exercises, discussion and evaluation questions. Members can contact Kristin Sewell via E-mail or at 517-908-8243 for prices and availability.

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Georgia Baptist Public Affairs Trainings Resume https://wwirr.com/georgia-baptist-public-affairs-trainings-resume/ Wed, 27 Jul 2022 13:39:06 +0000 https://wwirr.com/georgia-baptist-public-affairs-trainings-resume/ By MIKE GRIFFIN, Georgia Baptist Mission Board As Christians, we are called to be salt and light to the world. One way for Georgia Baptists to do this is how to have the greatest impact on shaping public policy in our state. With the constant attacks on our religious freedom (and now, the overthrow of […]]]>

By MIKE GRIFFIN, Georgia Baptist Mission Board

As Christians, we are called to be salt and light to the world. One way for Georgia Baptists to do this is how to have the greatest impact on shaping public policy in our state. With the constant attacks on our religious freedom (and now, the overthrow of Roe), it is important that church leaders know how to engage the government. This is the goal of training sessions held throughout the state by the Georgia Baptist Mission Board.

The council has scheduled seven training sessions from August to November to give church leaders insight into how to engage in the raging debates around ethical, moral and cultural issues.

Since 2016, these training sessions have helped participants understand why it is important for ministry leaders and churches to be involved in the policy-making process. Commitment and service are the key words to remember from this training: Be engaged in politics and serve government leaders.

Some of the most important moral and ethical issues affecting Baptists in Georgia are debated in the State Capitol, and they must make their positions known regarding each one. This year Georgia Baptists had their best year on capitol to voice their concerns.

These political debates have an impact on our communities and our ministries. These days, Christians are rightly concerned about the state of politics and culture, but unfortunately we have lost ground in the political arena because believers have become less engaged in the public square. . There has never been a time since the founding of our country when Christians needed to be more involved in government than today. We need biblical “salt and light” to help preserve our nation before it is too late.

Every pastor and ministry leader can benefit from upcoming training events, which delve deeper into the issues Georgians face at the state level and provide the information they need to impact policy and legislative debates.

We will also challenge our people to engage in the government process, either by holding elected leaders accountable or by running for office themselves.

These sessions will resume on August 11e at the South Central Network Association in Cordele, with Gary Leutzinger, associative mission strategist.

Trainers who join me at other events include Brad Hughes, public affairs committee adviser for the Georgia Baptist Mission Board and director of field operations for Governor Brian Kemp; Harrison Smith, regional director of the Alliance Defending Freedom; Kevin Cooke, chair of GBMB’s public affairs committee and former state representative who is also assistant director of athletics at Shorter University; and Josh McKoon, attorney and former state senator.

For locations, dates and times, and to register for upcoming 2022 training events, Click here.

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Mike Griffin is the Public Affairs Representative for the Georgia Baptist Mission Board

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CSU offering training on naloxone and overdose prevention https://wwirr.com/csu-offering-training-on-naloxone-and-overdose-prevention/ Tue, 26 Jul 2022 15:37:58 +0000 https://wwirr.com/csu-offering-training-on-naloxone-and-overdose-prevention/ Colorado State University Health Network, CSU School of Social Work and community partners are collaborating with agencies in Northern Colorado to provide training in overdose prevention and the use of naloxone. The trainings are available to anyone in the CSU community who wants to learn how to recognize the signs of overdose, how to prevent […]]]>

Colorado State University Health Network, CSU School of Social Work and community partners are collaborating with agencies in Northern Colorado to provide training in overdose prevention and the use of naloxone.

The trainings are available to anyone in the CSU community who wants to learn how to recognize the signs of overdose, how to prevent overdose, and how to administer a reversal medication called naloxone, also known as Narcan. Narcan is a nasal spray medication used to reverse opioid overdoses. It is effective, easy to use and has no side effects if used on a person who does not experience an overdose.

With the current rise in mental health needs and substance use across the country and increasing incidents of fentanyl-mixed drugs, the university is among a growing number of colleges responding by providing naloxone and education for students, faculty and staff as a Resource.

Preventable deaths

Although only a small number of members of the CSU community die from overdoses each year, most deaths could be preventable with education and an appropriate response, the team says. Naloxone kits and training are another tool in a resource kit that helps students, faculty, and staff avoid these tragedies.

“Over the past year, a network of professionals across northern Colorado have worked to increase overdose prevention education and access to naloxone, a life-saving opioid reversal drug. “said Pam McCracken, senior adviser to the CSU Health Network who helps lead the effort at the university. “This initiative aims to increase access to naloxone and overdose prevention education so that our community has this tool in case of an emergency. You don’t have to have a substance use disorder to be at risk; with both recreational drug use and addiction, the risk of death from overdose or exposure to fentanyl is a hidden danger in every community, and it’s an issue that affects almost everyone – most people know a friend, colleague or family member who may be in danger. »

As McCracken points out, even occasional drug use can put someone at risk, especially drugs containing fentanyl. CSU student results from a national survey show that 3.1% of students had used drugs such as cocaine within three months of the survey date, according to the National College Health Assessment in 2021. This could put them at risk of accidental overdose or exposure to dangerous or fatal levels of fentanyl. Additionally, over the past three years, approximately 6,200 students have voluntarily participated or been mandated to participate in counseling, educational programs, workshops, sobriety programs, or other substance use support through the University Day – Drugs, Alcohol and You – Programs.

CSU officers have been carrying Narcan for five years and, while numbers are not officially tracked, believe they used it twice during that time. Although the drug was not administered to a student or an employee in either case, the police were able to save the lives of those overdosing.

About fentanyl

Fentanyl is a cheap synthetic opioid that is 80 to 100 times stronger than morphine and 50 times stronger than heroin. Fentanyl can be found in pill or powder form and is often mixed with other drugs to produce cheaper substances. Therefore, some people may ingest fentanyl without knowing it. Fentanyl can be found in a variety of substances, including cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine, molly, ecstasy, and other recreational drugs. Because fentanyl is strong and often hidden in other substances, accidental overdose can happen quickly and unexpectedly.

Naloxone is an FDA-approved drug – often available under the brand name Narcan. It quickly reverses opioid overdoses by blocking opioid receptors in the body. It only temporarily reverses an opioid overdose for 30 to 60 minutes; anyone who receives it should still receive emergency medical attention. Naloxone is freely available in many communities across the United States.

Colorado State University already provides extensive education to students about the risks of alcohol and other drugs, and provides counseling and other support to students about substance use. Faculty and staff can access information and resources through the Employee Assistance Program.

Partners in the effort

The initiative to provide training and naloxone kits to CSU was supported by an extensive collaborative effort that includes the Northern Larimer County Health District, Project onthe CSU School of Social Work, CSU Health Network, Northern Colorado Harm Reduction Alliance, North Colorado Health Alliance, SummitStone Health Partners, and Ram Recovery.

The pilot program trainings took place this spring, with more than 240 people in attendance. As part of the trainings, 456 free Narcan kits were distributed and participants gave positive feedback on the program, stating that they are proud that CSU offers the training and that they appreciate that naloxone is available on campus. Narcan kits will be made available free of charge at future trainings and also made available alongside AED locations on campuses for emergency use, as well as in the CSU health network.

For more information on fentanyl and to request training on naloxone, visit https://health.colostate.edu/fentanyl-information-and-safety-tips/.

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Free professional training, certifications offered by UH community colleges https://wwirr.com/free-professional-training-certifications-offered-by-uh-community-colleges/ Sun, 24 Jul 2022 18:06:29 +0000 https://wwirr.com/free-professional-training-certifications-offered-by-uh-community-colleges/ With many local employers looking to fill vacancies, including thousands of essential healthcare jobs across the state, the University of Hawaii Community colleges continue to offer free, short-term training leading to industry credentials in the resilient healthcare, technology and skilled trades sectors through the Hana’s career path program. Applications for the fall trainings are now […]]]>

With many local employers looking to fill vacancies, including thousands of essential healthcare jobs across the state, the University of Hawaii Community colleges continue to offer free, short-term training leading to industry credentials in the resilient healthcare, technology and skilled trades sectors through the Hana’s career path program. Applications for the fall trainings are now available via the Hana Career Pathways website.

A variety of sessions of different lengths offered from August to December include a Certified Healthcare Nursing Aide, THIS certifications and courses such as HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) and arborist certification in the skilled trades, leading to paid employment and apprenticeship pathways.

“Employers are stepping up their collaboration with uh Community colleges to fill important, well-paying jobs across the state,” said uh Vice President for Community Colleges Erika Lacro. “We hope that our Hawaii residents will take this opportunity for free training, with hands-on experiences and support services, to find employment in an exciting new field or to advance their careers.

The Hana Career Pathways program prepares students to apply for registered apprenticeships and related degree programs, and connects students with work-based learning opportunities such as paid internships and guaranteed interviews with local employers.

The students get CNA works

Kristie Doss-Chinggraduate nursing student (CNA) training program to Downwind Community Collegewas one of 10 students who were offered jobs as CNAs during training. She said the program will help students gain valuable experience in practical nursing, since CNAs are the ones who see and work the most with patients.

Nursing students working with a simulation manikin
Paths of Hana CNA coaching

“Even before the end of the course, I had a job offer in hand, like everyone else in my class. Healthcare is a growing field, and nurses and CNAs in particular are desperately needed right now all over the country, and especially here in HawaiiDoss-Ching said. “I joined the training program because I had been laid off from the job I had worked in the hospitality industry for over 30 years, since March 2020 due to COVID. I knew I am not getting any younger , that health care is a growing field, that I had experience with family members and that I could do it, I knew that I wanted to learn more about nursing skills and I needed a job, so this was a win-win opportunity for me.

More than $2 million in Hana Career Pathways funding from the U.S. Department of Education is available for tuition this year. Eligible candidates receive tuition assistance for courses and other training costs such as books and industry certification exam fees. The program is free for most eligible participants, as many courses offer a 100% subsidy to cover all costs. Complementary services are also offered to students, including advice on college and professional studies, referrals to community partners offering support services and other financial aid.

“Demand for entry-level healthcare jobs has increased significantly during the pandemic and is expected to remain high. We appreciate the collaboration with the uh Community Colleges to create programs that combine the training and employment process,” said Janna Hoshide, of the Healthcare Association of Hawaii Senior Director of Workforce Development. “Through this program, employers also provide additional on-the-job skills training to support the student’s transition to their new job. This innovative model has enabled students to start new careers in healthcare and helped our members fill critical positions, but there remains a great need for additional students to fill a variety of vacancies across the State.

Find out more and apply online for current training.

Financial support for Hana Career Pathways was provided by U.S. Department of Education Federal Grant #V425G200038, Reimagining Workforce Preparation: Hana Career Pathways, in the amount of $13,370,383.58 for the period of October 1, 2020 to September 29, 2023. Ascendium Education Group, Hawaii Community Foundation and the Harold KL Castle Foundation support the uh Community college coordination with industry partners in targeted sectors identified as recession resilient in HawaiiTalent roadmap to recoveryissued by the Hawaii Executive collaboration.

Reinvent Your Career Banner for Hana Pathways

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Police training would increase across the state under new regional proposal | by Governor Jay Inslee | Washington State Governor’s Office | Jul 2022 https://wwirr.com/police-training-would-increase-across-the-state-under-new-regional-proposal-by-governor-jay-inslee-washington-state-governors-office-jul-2022/ Thu, 21 Jul 2022 23:59:16 +0000 https://wwirr.com/police-training-would-increase-across-the-state-under-new-regional-proposal-by-governor-jay-inslee-washington-state-governors-office-jul-2022/ State Senator John Lovick and Governor Jay Inslee watch as King County Sheriff Patti Cole-Tindall speaks in support of the regional proposal unveiled Thursday. (Photo from Governor’s Office) State and local law enforcement officials joined Gov. Jay Inslee on Thursday to announce a proposed expansion of the Criminal Justice Training Committee (CJTC). Regional campuses would […]]]>
State Senator John Lovick and Governor Jay Inslee watch as King County Sheriff Patti Cole-Tindall speaks in support of the regional proposal unveiled Thursday. (Photo from Governor’s Office)

State and local law enforcement officials joined Gov. Jay Inslee on Thursday to announce a proposed expansion of the Criminal Justice Training Committee (CJTC). Regional campuses would help agencies address a shortage of national officers and facilitate the recruitment of officers who are more representative of their home communities.

“As we heard from law enforcement today, this effort to fund more training and establish new training locations will not only help increase the number of officers, but will also help with officer recruitment. that better reflect the communities in which they work,” Inslee said.

[VIDEO: Gov. Jay Inslee press conference on CJTC expansion]

Recruitment is a challenge across the country

Correctional officers undergo training at the Criminal Justice Training Commission campus in Burien.
A new class of correctional officers recently graduated from CJTC in late june. (Photo CJTC)

While the national unemployment rate has returned to pre-pandemic levels, many occupations continue to experience labor shortages. Police Executive Search Forum data shows a 3.48% decrease over two years in overall police staffing. Officer recruiting is nationally competitive – many agencies take unusual measures such as offering hiring bonuses and hosting out-of-state recruiting events to attract officers . Agencies also experienced accelerated retirement rates. Hampered by attrition and difficult recruitment, some agencies operate with a significant labor shortage.

Inslee actively helped Washington agencies compete for officers. In 2016, Inslee signed an invoice increase the salaries of Washington State Patrol officers by 5%. The following year, Inslee signed a 16% salary increase for soldiers and a 20% salary increase for lieutenants and captains. Overall, combined with union-negotiated wage increases, state trooper pay has risen more than 40% since 2016.

Inslee also before signed legislation protect the pensions of retiring law enforcement officers from pandemic-related disruptions. This year, Inslee signed an invoice improve the benefits of law enforcement officers by increasing retirement allowances for officers with 25 years or more of service, and respond to calls from law enforcement officials by sign another invoice restore important policing tactics vital to public safety.

Police support more training under regional proposal

Governor Jay Inslee, surrounded by law enforcement officials, speaks out in favor of expanding police training to regional campuses

Law enforcement officers from across the state showed up in Burien Thursday to support the proposal, saying it would help them recruit and train more people from the communities they serve.

“There is a running deficit in policing, despite all the strategies law enforcement is trying to improve recruitment,” said Steve Crown, Wenatchee Police Department Chief and President of the Association of Washington sheriffs and police chiefs. “Sign-on bonuses, recruiting videos, in-person meetings at colleges and universities – this regional training approach is just one more piece of the puzzle that is absolutely worth completing.”

In Washington State, vacancies range from a few positions at small agencies to hundreds of positions at large agencies.

Expanding to regional campuses would speed up the process of training and certifying new hires, helping agencies fill vacancies. The expansion would also reduce the geographic barriers that trainees face in pursuing extended training. Agencies also expect the strategy to make it easier to hire more local agents, helping agencies better represent the communities they serve.

Pasco is one of the planned locations for a new regional training office, which will serve the entire Tri-Cities area.

“The regional academy concept will help us find talented officers and allow for local cultural influences that will better reflect our communities,” Pasco Police Chief Ken Roske said. “Tri-City Law Enforcement is excited about the prospect of training new police officers at a Pasco BLEA campus.”

More slots provide more options for more recruits

“Communities thrive when we have exceptionally trained men and women serving Washington State departments,” King County Sheriff Patti Cole-Tindall said. “These additional campuses will allow each region to benefit from newly appointed officers committed to upholding CJTC’s values ​​and high standards for public safety.

Law enforcement professionals statewide are each trained and certified by the CJTC. Junior police officers complete a 720-hour internship Basic Law Enforcement Academy. Side officers take an equivalency course. The CJTC also hosts advanced curricula on special investigations, crisis intervention, train-the-trainer and other topics. The vast majority of trainees complete the academy at the Burien campus. Some are trained at a Spokane campus.

The academy is housed in person at either the Burien or Spokane facilities. A centralized model ensures trainees receive consistent training, but imposes travel and scheduling challenges for trainees beyond King and Spokane counties. Many potential recruits may not be able to leave their families or jobs for an extended period.

“Especially for agencies in the middle of the state, trainings require agents to be away from their lives and families. If the regional campuses were closer, it’s time they came home,” said Megan Saunders, communications manager for CJTC.

Police academy cadets show off a class project, a memorial for a deceased officer.
Basic Law Enforcement Class 822 created a memorial plaque for deceased Seattle Police Department officer Lexi Harris as part of a class project. The monument is exhibited in the premises of the CJTC in Burien. (CJTC Photo)

State training curriculum reflects updated standards

As state laws and police best practices evolve, having training facilities closer to departments would also benefit ongoing officer training. CJTC’s evidence-based curriculum includes courses in concepts such as cognitive command training, intended to create a structured system for filtering and processing information to expand an officer’s perceptual scope. The trainings align with the latest standards approved by legislators in recent sessions.

“Demands for Commission training remain high, and the expanded regional training is just one example of how Governor Inslee and lawmakers are finding ways to meet important agency needs,” said Monica Alexander, Executive Director of CJTC. “This is an exciting time of change for police recruiting and training, and we look forward to the positive impact this expansion will have on policing in our state.”

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LU Group will conduct trainings on crime and disaster recovery https://wwirr.com/lu-group-will-conduct-trainings-on-crime-and-disaster-recovery/ Thu, 21 Jul 2022 18:00:48 +0000 https://wwirr.com/lu-group-will-conduct-trainings-on-crime-and-disaster-recovery/ With a series of upcoming trainings and workshops, Lamar University Recovery and Resilience Academy (RRA) is on a mission to ensure that the local community is prepared and educated on not only natural disaster preparedness, but also the post-disaster crime control, writes LU. Shelbe Rodriguez. “These events were created to help our local community, especially […]]]>

With a series of upcoming trainings and workshops, Lamar University Recovery and Resilience Academy (RRA) is on a mission to ensure that the local community is prepared and educated on not only natural disaster preparedness, but also the post-disaster crime control, writes LU. Shelbe Rodriguez.

“These events were created to help our local community, especially nonprofits in the Southeast Texas region, as they are our stakeholders,” said Dr. Cheng-Hsien Lin, Associate Professor and director of criminal justice. “Our community has faced natural disasters almost every year, or every two years. Although our primary emergency resource is the Federal Emergency Management Agency, it does not always have enough staff to help those in need. So we are trying to provide training to local community leaders that will educate them on how to better prepare for future natural disasters. »

The workshops are designed to provide a learning platform that integrates academic outcomes with Southeast Texas law enforcement practices, emergency management and Southeast Texas officials, combat against domestic terrorism, mass violence, extremist ideology, hurricanes and floods, and school and church shootings.

Lin said this particular workshop will advise the local community on the risks they might face when a disaster strikes the area and what situations might arise right after.

“When a disaster strikes, we always think about evacuating or finding a safer place to go, but we really should prepare and be prepared for what’s to come,” he said. “Think about it – when we evacuate our local community, people in care homes or people with disabilities often have to stay. There are always individuals left behind. We need to identify people who need help and we We need to educate these people about resources, where they can go and who they can call when they need help.

Dr. Chiung-Fang Chang, the academy’s senior PI, said that this will be the first series of its kind organized by the academy, but that in the future they hope to become a “center of ‘information’ for the Southeast Texas community. times of need.

“We hope to get some guidance from community leaders on things we may not be aware of when it comes to disasters and to understand how we can help,” Lin said. “We want to continue these trainings for the community and find out what they need. The more we know, the better we can prepare to help them and we can recover more quickly from disasters.

The RRA is sponsored by the Center for Resiliency at Lamar University in the State of Texas, with the ultimate goal of bringing together stakeholders from many disciplines to work in tandem with the local community to provide information on disaster preparedness. emergency situations and ways to mitigate potential losses. and damage.

In September, the group will host a community forum again, welcoming Jefferson County Judge Jeff Branick to lead a discussion regarding the Neches Regional Flood Plan Draft Public Meeting. On September 9, from 2 to 4 p.m., LU’s CICE room 113 will welcome guests to a meeting moderated by Branick and other members of the Neches Regional Flood Planning Group, as well as his technical consultants from Freese and Nichols.

The public is invited to attend the information meeting for feedback and comments on the draft Neches Regional Flood Plan. Additional information about the NRFPG is available at https://nechesfloodplanning.org/.

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Project Sweet Potato is used in trainings across the state https://wwirr.com/project-sweet-potato-is-used-in-trainings-across-the-state/ Tue, 19 Jul 2022 00:09:29 +0000 https://wwirr.com/project-sweet-potato-is-used-in-trainings-across-the-state/ FRESNO, Calif. (KFSN) — An agricultural project in Fresno County produces more than food. It will now be used in formations across California. The sweet potato project helped teens in Southwest Fresno get interested in farming while teaching them life lessons. During the program, African-American students learn how to grow, market, and sell sweet potatoes. […]]]>

FRESNO, Calif. (KFSN) — An agricultural project in Fresno County produces more than food. It will now be used in formations across California.

The sweet potato project helped teens in Southwest Fresno get interested in farming while teaching them life lessons.

During the program, African-American students learn how to grow, market, and sell sweet potatoes.

“Our young people, they could have done anything – they could have been out there on those streets, they could have been involved in gangs, they could have been involved in drugs, but they decided and they committed to being a part of this program to learn about leadership, about self-esteem, about agribusiness, about entrepreneurship,” Yolanda Randles told Action News in a 2020 interview.

Randles is the executive director of the West Fresno Family Resource Center, which runs the program.

The goal of the program is to keep children out of gangs and away from drugs and alcohol.

With funding from the Fresno County Department of Behavioral Health, there is also a focus on mental health awareness.

“You build community. You build safe space. You build relationships,” said division director Ahmad Bahrami. “Throughout the program they talk a bit about wellness, healthy decision-making and healthy lifestyles, and a bit about mental health. So it’s not a direct, stigmatizing way. It’s more like, like you’ By learning these things, you’re also learning about wellness and what to do if you’re having difficulty.”

The California Alliance for Child and Family Services will now use the Sweet Potato Project as an example of an innovative, non-traditional approach that can work with young people.

On July 26, organizations in California, focused on at-risk youth, are invited to attend training on the program, even to hear from participants and the benefits they have experienced.

The training event will be held in-person from 1-3:30 p.m. at the Fresno State Student Recreation Center on N. Woodrow. There will also be a virtual option. Registration is open.

Program organizers hope it will allow other organizations to plant the seeds for a better future across the state.

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