Partner communities – WWIRR http://wwirr.com/ Fri, 05 Aug 2022 19:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://wwirr.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-48-120x120.png Partner communities – WWIRR http://wwirr.com/ 32 32 County of St. Croix employees give back to our communities | New https://wwirr.com/county-of-st-croix-employees-give-back-to-our-communities-new/ Fri, 05 Aug 2022 19:00:00 +0000 https://wwirr.com/county-of-st-croix-employees-give-back-to-our-communities-new/ Each year in the weeks leading up to the St. Croix County Fair, county employees participate in a food drive to give back to those in need of food assistance. This year, St. Croix County employees donated more than 200 pounds of food to the St. Croix Valley Food Bank in Hudson. The St. Croix […]]]>

Each year in the weeks leading up to the St. Croix County Fair, county employees participate in a food drive to give back to those in need of food assistance. This year, St. Croix County employees donated more than 200 pounds of food to the St. Croix Valley Food Bank in Hudson.

The St. Croix Valley Food Bank has mobile food pantries in Baldwin, Somerset, Glenwood City and Deer Park. Pantries are open from 11 a.m. to noon every Thursday of the month. The location changes every week.

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US Senator Baldwin: Raising Over $141 Million to Help Wisconsin Communities Build More Resilient Infrastructure https://wwirr.com/us-senator-baldwin-raising-over-141-million-to-help-wisconsin-communities-build-more-resilient-infrastructure/ Thu, 04 Aug 2022 15:49:29 +0000 https://wwirr.com/us-senator-baldwin-raising-over-141-million-to-help-wisconsin-communities-build-more-resilient-infrastructure/ WASHINGTON, DC – U.S. Senator Tammy Baldwin supported and worked to pass the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, and now Wisconsin is set to receive federal funding estimated at $141,771,514 over the next five years to help build more resilient infrastructure from the new Resilient Operations Promotion for the PROTECT (Transformative, Efficient, and Cost-Saving Transportation) […]]]>

WASHINGTON, DC – U.S. Senator Tammy Baldwin supported and worked to pass the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, and now Wisconsin is set to receive federal funding estimated at $141,771,514 over the next five years to help build more resilient infrastructure from the new Resilient Operations Promotion for the PROTECT (Transformative, Efficient, and Cost-Saving Transportation) formula program.

“In recent years, communities in Wisconsin have been hard hit by recurring storms, floods and severe weather. I have seen firsthand how these storms have washed away roads and damaged our highways and bridges, threatening the ability of Wisconsinans to get to work, get their goods to market, and drive our economy forward. As climate change drives more extreme weather, we need to make sure that when we rebuild our infrastructure, we’re not just using American workers and American-made products, but also building stronger infrastructure. and more resistant to flood damage. , extreme weather conditions and natural disasters,’ said Senator Baldwin. “This Federal Infrastructure Act investment will help Wisconsin communities build stronger, more climate-resilient infrastructure that will better withstand extreme weather events. This federal funding for Wisconsin will help ensure our infrastructure is built to last and save taxpayers money. »

In an ongoing effort to combat the effects of climate change and address the rising costs of extreme weather events negatively impacting communities, the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) announced new guidelines and funding $7.3 billion PROTECT Formula program to help states and communities better prepare for and respond better to extreme weather events like flooding, extreme heat and wildfires. This is a unique program, made possible by the infrastructure act that Senator Baldwin voted for.

New PROTECT Formula Program funding is available to states over five years to make transportation infrastructure more resilient to future weather events and other natural disasters by focusing on resilience planning, improving the resilience of existing transport and evacuation routes and by dealing with highways at risk. Infrastructure. In general, eligible projects include highway and transit projects, cycling and pedestrian facilities, and port facilities, including those that help improve evacuations or disaster relief. States are encouraged to work with regional and local partner organizations to prioritize transportation and emergency response improvements, as well as address vulnerabilities.

Eligible resilience improvements may involve adapting existing transportation infrastructure or new construction to keep communities safe by enhancing the infrastructure’s ability to withstand extreme weather events and other physical hazards that become severe. increasingly common and intense. Eligible project choices may include the use of natural or green infrastructure to buffer future storm surges and provide flood protection, as well as the restoration of aquatic ecosystems. PROTECT projects can also help improve the resilience of transportation networks that serve traditionally underserved and underrepresented communities, especially during natural disasters and evacuations.

PROTECT builds on other USDOT actions to address the climate crisis and that support the Biden administration’s whole-of-government approach to reducing greenhouse gas pollution by 2030. other USDOT actions include a proposed rule for states and municipalities to track and reduce greenhouse gas emissions; the Carbon Reduction Program, which will provide $6.4 billion in formula funding to state and local governments to develop carbon reduction strategies; and the National Electric Vehicle Infrastructure (NEVI) formula program, which will provide $5 billion to states to build a national electric vehicle charging network, an important step in making electric vehicle charging accessible to all Americans.

For more information on the new PROTECT formula program and tips, please visit the FHWA website and fact sheet. The Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act established both the PROTECT formula and the discretionary grant programs.

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Can the bank-starved communities of the Bronx finally cash in after decades of redlining and mass closures? – Bronx Times https://wwirr.com/can-the-bank-starved-communities-of-the-bronx-finally-cash-in-after-decades-of-redlining-and-mass-closures-bronx-times/ Tue, 02 Aug 2022 19:37:02 +0000 https://wwirr.com/can-the-bank-starved-communities-of-the-bronx-finally-cash-in-after-decades-of-redlining-and-mass-closures-bronx-times/ With a dearth of fully serviced and staffed banks in her area, if Grand Concourse resident May Carter needs to visit a bank, she does her best to make the most of a sometimes hour-long drive. where financial anxieties invade his thoughts. “If I have to make a bank, it’s like a date. I feel […]]]>

With a dearth of fully serviced and staffed banks in her area, if Grand Concourse resident May Carter needs to visit a bank, she does her best to make the most of a sometimes hour-long drive. where financial anxieties invade his thoughts.

“If I have to make a bank, it’s like a date. I feel like I need to get dressed,” Carter, 40, said. be hit with withdrawal fees.

Banks are rare in the South Bronx neighborhoods of Morrisania, Longwood, and Melrose. It thins out even further along Morris Avenue in the western part of the borough to Intervale Avenue and Fox Street in the east, and from Crotona and Claremont parks in the north to East 150th Street in the south, where customers describe a barren wasteland of full-service financial hubs.

In the Bronx, seven banks closed 17 branches from 2018 to 2021 — more than half in 2020 — reducing the total number of full-service branches to just 131, from 144 in June 2018, according to the Association for Neighborhood & Housing Development. .

Without a full-service institution, Bronxites who need a bank rely on check cashers, pawnbrokers, or branches of the largest national banks that typically charge high monthly maintenance fees for customers without direct deposit or certain minimum balances, several credit unions and Bronx residents said. Bronx Times.

“There are no branches,” said Gregory Jost, Banana Kelly’s political and campaigns adviser. “Some say it’s a banking wasteland, but you can call it a banking apartheid zone.”

For some South Bronx residents, last month’s Bronx Federal Credit Union launch event was the first time they had access to a bank account in “years.” Photo Robbie Sequeira

And even the Bronx hubs along Jerome Avenue, Grand Concourse, and University Avenue lack full-service branches.

The South Bronx — where 38% of its residents live below the poverty line — and Manhattan’s Lower East Side fell victim to the then-depression that cut off communities teeming with black and immigrant communities from opportunities and wealth creation infrastructure.

As the Lower East Side finally bounced back in the 70s and 80s, thanks in large part to credit unions, the South Bronx hopes the launch of a new mobile credit union — with hopes for a permanent location in 2023 – may lead to a similar revitalization.

NYU researchers in 2018 found that the minimum opening deposit was significantly higher in majority black neighborhoods ($80.60) than in white neighborhoods ($68.50). Photo Robbie Sequeira

The Bronx People’s Credit Union, an effort of several groups – Banana Kelly Community Improvement Association, University Neighborhood Housing Program, We Stay/Nos Quedamos and the Women’s Housing and Economic Development Corporation – aims to reinvent banking “for the Bronx, by the Bronx .

Recently closed banks are also joining the initiative in hopes of closing the gaps after their individual closures.

“We heard from our community partners that introducing a community development credit union to the Bronx would make a big difference and we listened,” says Karina Saltman, senior managing director of Webster Bank, which closed its 149th Street in the Hub in August 2020. and is a credit union partner.

Others, like New Covenant Dominion Credit Union, a minority-owned financial institution founded in 2007 by the National Credit Union Administration, seek to create once-prohibited wealth-building opportunities in underbanked Bronx communities. , like bank-starved Morrisania, to increase staffing levels and full financial capacity. service building.

More than 100 branches closed in 2020 in New York, an increase from 74 closures in 2019 and 53 in 2018. While closures have spread across the city, a quarter of bank closures in 2020 were in areas of low- and moderate-income census, and 20% were predominantly black or Latino communities.

Many communities in the Bronx didn’t stand a chance when President Franklin D. Roosevelt enacted the New Deal, and redlining has become a central benchmark for today’s racial wealth gap.

As the New Deal infused capital into cities and Robert Moses shaped New York in his vision in the 1930s, the federal Home Owners’ Loan Corporation (HOLC) shaped America into the uneven landscapes it is. today.

In the Bronx, neighborhoods like Riverdale and Fieldston — which HOLC has recognized as the borough’s newest and most suburban neighborhoods — have achieved Type A green status for investment. They were most desirable for what they didn’t have: communities of color.

Neighborhoods where black people lived — the South Bronx in particular — were rated “D,” a scarlet letter that deemed those communities ineligible for federal investment, and HOLC ratings severely limited black homeowners’ access to mortgage credit and home growth. the equity in their home.

Where areas like Riverdale and Fieldston benefited from the Depression-era federal HOLC program, the South Bronx was shut out of opportunities for investment and wealth creation. Map courtesy of NYC Urbanism

“They would say redlining is a self-fulfilling prophecy,” Jost said. “Banks are delisting the neighborhood because they say it’s a bad investment, but by delisting the neighborhood it’s going to lead to decades of underinvestment and underbanking of our neighborhoods.”

The Community Reinvestment Act of 1977 was primarily about redlining, but bank closings began to ramp up around the 1980s in the Bronx.

During the Great Recession, comparably sized banks closed at higher rates in markets serving communities of color between 2009 and 2014, with black and Latino communities losing half of their branches.

In 2015, according to an FDIC analysis of underbanked households, 30% of households without bank accounts resided in Mott Haven and University Heights.

And even in the face of bank closures – such as the December 2020 closures of two Popular Bank branches in Hunts Point, the massive 2021 closures of Ridgewood Savings Bank on Sedgwick Avenue and Van Cortlandt Avenue West as well as Jerome Avenue and West Mosholu Parkway North — calls from locals have fallen on deaf ears.

The uneven distribution of bank branches imposes a cost on residents of communities of color in the form of increased distance and travel time to the nearest banking institution.

And mobile branches not only meet the challenge of increasing access to banking services throughout the borough, but also improve banking experiences. For black and Hispanic bankers, ATM fees, overdraft fees and routine service fees add a disproportionate cost.

NYU researchers in 2018 found that the minimum opening deposit was significantly higher in majority black neighborhoods ($80.60) than in white neighborhoods ($68.50).

“Before, I would go to the check box and buy a prepaid card for $10. Then I would have to pay extra money to load my money onto the card,” said Sonya Ferguson, president of the Banana Kelly Block Association and member of Bronx Community Board 2. “If I wanted to put $100 on my card, I had to pay $5. When I needed to withdraw money from my card, I had to pay $2.50 to get my money, plus $1 at the ATM. You end up spending the money you have just to use it.

The road ahead for Bronx credit unions and wealth creators to reverse the harms of redlining and systemic underbanking in the Bronx is a long one, they tell The Times.

“We want this to go to the East Bronx, to these other communities that might have seen two or three of their branches disappear, and building this has a lot of possibilities and a lot of different neighborhoods or quadrants,” Jost said. “But we want to make sure we get it right with our first branch in the South Bronx before we build this thing and take on these borough-wide challenges.”

Contact Robbie Sequeira at rsequeira@schnepsmedia.com or (718) 260-4599. For more coverage follow us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram @bronxtimes

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Titus O’Neil talks about volunteering in communities and how to get involved locally https://wwirr.com/titus-oneil-talks-about-volunteering-in-communities-and-how-to-get-involved-locally/ Mon, 01 Aug 2022 02:12:57 +0000 https://wwirr.com/titus-oneil-talks-about-volunteering-in-communities-and-how-to-get-involved-locally/ Titus O’Neil wants you to get involved in local charities. Although he was once a regular on WWE television, Titus O’Neil shifted his career within WWE to become the company’s global ambassador. In his role, O’Neil regularly assists with many local charities and community works as part of the promotion. Related article Matt Cardona Eats […]]]>

Titus O’Neil wants you to get involved in local charities.

Although he was once a regular on WWE television, Titus O’Neil shifted his career within WWE to become the company’s global ambassador. In his role, O’Neil regularly assists with many local charities and community works as part of the promotion.

Matt Cardona Eats Diamond Cutter, Family Flair Fights Back, Wrestling Celebrated | Size of the fight

In a new interview with Fightful, the former WWE Tag Team Champion explained how WWE got involved with the Feeding America Network.

“Three Square is part of the Feeding America network. My first introduction to them was at SummerSlam last year. We had the opportunity to come and honor them as a community champion by doing our showcase. is the best place to amplify their message and the messages of many others regarding food insecurity One in six Las Vegas residents are food insecure So to be able to come here and bring attention to what they do here consistently. It’s a beautiful building, built with love. Lots of great sponsors who support this place and lots of great human beings who are here every day. We are here for the Money in the Bank weekend. We were here for SummerSlam last year. I’m pretty frequent here now that I have a production studio here too. So being able to pick up the phone and call Brian and him say, “Hey, I want to come see this I think every WWE Superstar on our list not only understands community, but also understands being in need. Most of us came from situations of misery. Having the opportunity to be the ones to orchestrate and help people become more empowered is a huge honor.”

When asked where people can start if they want to help in their local spaces, O’Neil gave a detailed answer.

“I always tell people to find something that you’re passionate about at home. It might even be something that you can even see on social media from a distance and say, ‘Hey, there’s got to be an organization that I can go with. partner here at home who I can help amplify their message – volunteer or donate money to. Very respectful that people can do whatever they want with their time, talent and resources, but I always tell people that it has to start at home. It has to start in your hometown. For me, it starts with my family. I can’t go out and bless the world and my children feel empty. My two sons and my daughter have always been the number one priority. But they also received the love and dignity that people from all walks of life put into me and put into them and now they’re coming out and doing amazing things. My eldest son is at UCF now TJ the first thing he does is partner up with Be The Match which is looking to help kids with single cell disease went and bought a bunch of stuff for a kid who loved Spider-Man and spent time with him in the hospital. It wasn’t something I told him to do, it wasn’t something his coaches told him to do. Someone reached out to him on social media, told him the story, and he chose to go for it. Him and my youngest son Titus then my d daughter [Leah]. I couldn’t be more proud of them and the human beings they are. They being the young people of tomorrow, I would say everyone – don’t limit the impact of your children. Because my life was changed by the children
who were seven/eight/nine years old who had to fight cancer and they beat it. Unfortunately, there were a few who didn’t. But what they’ve done in their respective communities to bring people together who wouldn’t normally be together. I think the happy part of tragedy and trauma is that sometimes people are more aware of how lucky we are, and then the unfortunate part is that sometimes those people who should bring those people together—whether it’s the political leader or adults—they get in the way of what the young people of tomorrow are capable of because of their frozen thought process or their ingrained hatred or whatever keeps them from being good human beings.”

O’Neil continues to strengthen WWE relationships outside of the ring as he orchestrates multiple partnerships with different charities.

Elsewhere in the interview, O’Neil talked about Fred Rosser. To learn more, click here.

If you are local to the Las Vegas area, please support the Three Square Food Bank.

If you use any of the quotes above, please credit the original source with an H/T and refer back to Fightful for the transcript.

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Isola Communities begins vertical construction in Sobremesa https://wwirr.com/isola-communities-begins-vertical-construction-in-sobremesa/ Fri, 29 Jul 2022 19:01:08 +0000 https://wwirr.com/isola-communities-begins-vertical-construction-in-sobremesa/ SURPRISE, Ariz., July 29. 10, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Isola Communities, a leading Seattle-based multi-family developer, has begun vertical construction at Sobremesa Villas, its second Build for Rent community. The first phase of vertical construction includes the rental office and the residents’ pavilion in addition to 33 houses, a model house and a garage. The […]]]>

SURPRISE, Ariz., July 29. 10, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Isola Communities, a leading Seattle-based multi-family developer, has begun vertical construction at Sobremesa Villas, its second Build for Rent community.

The first phase of vertical construction includes the rental office and the residents’ pavilion in addition to 33 houses, a model house and a garage. The remaining 116 homes and eight garages will be built in four more construction phases. The grand opening of the community is scheduled for winter 2022 and is expected to be fully completed by summer 2023.

“Beginning vertical construction in one of our communities is a milestone that never gets old,” said Jeff LePage, Isola Communities Partner. “With Sobremesa Villas and all of our Build for Rent communities, it’s even more special knowing that we are bringing high quality, sustainable housing solutions to the area.”

Sobremesa Villas covers approximately 15 acres and offers amenities such as open spaces with lawn games, a heated pool, dog park, and fitness center. Future residents will have a choice of one-bedroom, one-bedroom and two-bedroom open-plan homes, all of which will be built with energy-efficient technology and will also include a variety of eco-friendly features.

“With all of our communities in Arizona, we have prioritized sustainability,” said Harry Nayyar, a partner at Isola Communities. “Not only did we want to ensure that we benefit from the areas in which we build, but the sustainable features mean that we are able to provide our residents with a better and healthier living environment. We very much look forward to welcoming all of our new residents over the next two years. »

About Isola Communities

Founded in 2008, Isola Homes and its affiliates have focused on providing beneficial housing solutions to the communities in which they build. Its houses are designed to improve the habitability and accessibility of each neighborhood. After the company expanded into apartment construction in 2015 under Isola Communities, it successfully completed four apartment projects. Currently, Isola Communities has 10 soon-to-be-available multi-family buildings in 8 different Seattle neighborhoods, as well as one near the University of Washington Tacoma. Additional information about Isola Communities and its affiliates is available at isolacommunities.com.

Contact:

Danielle North

(206) 737-9700

media@isolacommunities.com

Related images

Image 1: Sobremesa Villas by Isola Communities in Surprise, AZ

The first buildings being constructed at Sobremesa Villas by Isola Communities in Surprise, AZ.

This content was posted through the press release distribution service on Newswire.com.

  • Sobremesa Villas by Isola Communities in Surprise, AZ

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Help Iowa groups grow our communities through thriving community https://wwirr.com/help-iowa-groups-grow-our-communities-through-thriving-community/ Sun, 24 Jul 2022 11:02:19 +0000 https://wwirr.com/help-iowa-groups-grow-our-communities-through-thriving-community/ The Des Moines Register has published several articles this year examining the challenges families in Iowa face in finding affordable, high-quality child care. The challenges are even greater in finding appropriate care if your child has special needs. For families in the Iowa City area, the Arc of Southeast Iowa can help. It operates an […]]]>

The Des Moines Register has published several articles this year examining the challenges families in Iowa face in finding affordable, high-quality child care.

The challenges are even greater in finding appropriate care if your child has special needs.

For families in the Iowa City area, the Arc of Southeast Iowa can help. It operates an inclusive child care program serving children with and without special needs.

The program now serves 30 children, but many more are on a waiting list. The Arc therefore plans to more than double the program, to serve approximately 70 children and to raise funds to expand its facilities.

One way to do this is through A Community Thrives, a grantmaking and crowdfunding initiative of the Gannett Foundation, sponsored by the Des Moines Register’s parent company, Gannett.

Emily Haworth's 3-year-old son, Nolan, who has special needs, has been attending the Iowa City-based Arc of Southeast Iowa for two years.  She says:

The program is designed to be a convenient way for our readers to support local nonprofits, schools, and civic organizations that do important work to strengthen our communities.

Previously:A community thrives: Here’s a way to help hard-working groups grow your community

This year, 17 organizations across Iowa, including The Arc, qualified to participate in the fundraising portion of A Community Thrives. You can learn more about these organizations and the work they do and donate at acommunitythrives.mightycause.com. (Filter for “Iowa.”) Fundraising began July 18 and continues through August 12.

All participating organizations will keep the crowdfunding money they raise on their individual Community Thrives pages. Participants who meet the fundraising thresholds – of at least $3,000 in eligible donations for small organizations and $6,000 for large organizations – are eligible for grants, which will be announced this fall. Last year, A Community Thrivs awarded $35,000 in grants to organizations in Iowa.

A community flourishes.

This year’s participants reflect efforts to meet the current and emerging needs of our communities as well as to uplift the human spirit.

After:Your Donations Through A Community Thrives Help Iowa Nonprofits Fill Crucial Funding Gaps

One of the organizations participating for the first time is the United Upper Nile South Sudanese Community Association in Iowa, which seeks to help refugees from the war-torn country build a better life in Iowa. The association operates a food pantry in Des Moines that serves approximately 120 families per month. Inflation has made it even more difficult for the association’s clients to feed their families.

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What St. Louis can learn from underresourced communities | Columnists https://wwirr.com/what-st-louis-can-learn-from-underresourced-communities-columnists/ Fri, 22 Jul 2022 19:56:00 +0000 https://wwirr.com/what-st-louis-can-learn-from-underresourced-communities-columnists/ As St. Louisians, we often speak about the challenges of our city and region. We wonder why we can’t overcome them to be as successful as cities like Nashville, Austin, Texas and Charlotte. If we are to learn how to overcome our challenges, we must look to St. Louisians and communities who have worked to […]]]>

As St. Louisians, we often speak about the challenges of our city and region. We wonder why we can’t overcome them to be as successful as cities like Nashville, Austin, Texas and Charlotte.

If we are to learn how to overcome our challenges, we must look to St. Louisians and communities who have worked to overcome more than their fair share.

I believe the story of the 24:1 community provides many lessons that our region can learn from.

The 24:1 community – an area made up of 24 (now 23) municipalities in the footprint of the Normandy Schools Collaborative in North St. Louis County – was born during the volatile mortgage crisis of 2008. Like the pandemic in 2020, the crisis hit resourced sub-communities earliest and hardest.

My good friend, the late Honorable Mayor Mary Carter of Pagedale, called together her peers from surrounding municipalities to start a conversation about how to resolve this crisis, and she asked if we at Beyond Housing could help. Our organization had earned his trust over the previous years through our community development work in Pagedale, which included the construction of 100 new homes. She told her peers that we could be trusted and would be a good partner. From there, a radical conversation began about how these 24 cities could work together.

These discussions have broadened to include residents and other stakeholders. What resulted was more than a community, it was a movement.

Flash forward to the present day. Our region always talks about its same challenges. Yet the 24:1 community, despite enormous challenges, is making progress.

Together with the community and many partners, we have raised and invested over $150 million in the 24:1. Together we have built hundreds of new homes and rehabilitated hundreds more. Together we built a movie theater in Pagedale as well as two senior centers, a Midwest BankCentre, Affinia and BJC health centers, and Carter Commons, which is home to several minority-owned businesses. Many families have experienced greater success as we strive to strengthen ourselves further through holistic services provided to families in 509 affordable rental homes throughout the community.

Together, we began to change the narrative.

Working together also gave us more power to get up when we needed to. During the 2020 education crisis in the Normandy School District, the 24:1 Municipal Partnership – a partnership of mayors and local leaders – and hundreds of residents led the charge for greater accountability and change in district leadership, as well as the right of residents to elect officers to the district executive board.

In 2015, twelve 24:1 municipalities filed a lawsuit challenging Senate Bill 5. The bill unfairly capped traffic fines at 12.5% ​​of municipal operating revenue, compared to 20% elsewhere in the state. If we had not stood up together, Bill 5 would have crippled the budgets of these small communities and made it difficult for them to survive.

Things are far from perfect, but they are much different than before. The 24:1 community is living proof of what can be achieved when people realize their collective power and start working together. When people decide it’s time to act because no one else will. When everyone understands that an investment in part of a community is a step forward for the collective whole.

This is an example that our region must follow.

In my last article, I wrote that if a St. Louis renaissance were to occur, it would begin within our underresourced communities. We have invested heavily in Saint-Louis over the past few years. As Midwest BankCentre President and CEO Orvin Kimbrough recently said at a beyond-housing event sponsored by the St. Louis Business Journal, “If we really take aspects of our region that have been left behind, we are going to be a world-class city once again.

No matter where we live in this region, we are part of a greater whole. A whole that is only as strong as all of us put together.

When the rest of St. Louis understands this as well as members of the 24:1 community, we will finally move our region forward, once and for all.

Chris Krehmeyer is President and CEO of Beyond Housing.

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Planned power outage will impact three communities in Colleton County https://wwirr.com/planned-power-outage-will-impact-three-communities-in-colleton-county/ Wed, 20 Jul 2022 19:16:56 +0000 https://wwirr.com/planned-power-outage-will-impact-three-communities-in-colleton-county/ COLLETON COUNTY, SC (WCBD) – Several communities will be affected by a power outage expected in Colleton County late next week. Dominion Energy will be conducting a scheduled outage that will allow them to perform critical maintenance of the distribution facilities on Friday, July 29. The Colleton County Fire-Rescue Emergency Management Division said the outage […]]]>

COLLETON COUNTY, SC (WCBD) – Several communities will be affected by a power outage expected in Colleton County late next week.

Dominion Energy will be conducting a scheduled outage that will allow them to perform critical maintenance of the distribution facilities on Friday, July 29.

The Colleton County Fire-Rescue Emergency Management Division said the outage will affect the communities of Ruffin, Smoaks and Williams.

“Although the scheduled maintenance window is between 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m., Dominion expects the work to be completed by lunchtime that day,” said Meagan Utsey, Public Information Officer for Colleton County. .

The county will not be able to use its reserve shelter during the planned outage. Officials say the shelter will also be without electricity and the backup generator only powers the lights inside the building and not the air conditioning system.

“Fire-Rescue’s Emergency Management Division will monitor conditions during the outage,” Utsey said. “We have been in contact with various Emergency Support Function partner agencies to plan the allocation of resources in the event that the outage lasts longer than expected.

News 2 has contacted Dominion Energy for more information.

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Middleburg Communities and Stockbridge Acquire Indigo Champions Ridge, a 300-Unit Class A Multifamily Community in Orlando MSA https://wwirr.com/middleburg-communities-and-stockbridge-acquire-indigo-champions-ridge-a-300-unit-class-a-multifamily-community-in-orlando-msa/ Mon, 18 Jul 2022 20:30:00 +0000 https://wwirr.com/middleburg-communities-and-stockbridge-acquire-indigo-champions-ridge-a-300-unit-class-a-multifamily-community-in-orlando-msa/ VIENNA, Virginia–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Middleburg Communities (“Middleburg”), a fully integrated multi-family development, investment, construction and management company operating in the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic United States, and Stockbridge, a private real estate investment management company, announced today that they have acquired Indigo Champions Ridge, a 300-unit, Class A multifamily community located in Davenport, Florida, a suburb of Orlando, […]]]>

VIENNA, Virginia–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Middleburg Communities (“Middleburg”), a fully integrated multi-family development, investment, construction and management company operating in the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic United States, and Stockbridge, a private real estate investment management company, announced today that they have acquired Indigo Champions Ridge, a 300-unit, Class A multifamily community located in Davenport, Florida, a suburb of Orlando, one of the fastest growing metropolitan statistics in the country. Middleburg will assume management, operating and leasing responsibilities for the community, which was completed in 2022 and features resort-style amenities, a modern clubhouse and high-end finishes.

“We are excited to enter the Orlando market with the acquisition of Indigo Champions Ridge, one of the area’s leading multi-family communities,” said Chris Finlay, CEO of Middleburg Communities. “We have leveraged our proprietary data, research and analytics platform to study the market and are very bullish on its long-term fundamentals. We look forward to using our proven operating platform to unlock value for our investors and provide an exceptional living experience for our residents. »

Indigo Champions Ridge consists of three 10-story apartment buildings located on approximately 17 acres. The property offers a mix of 1, 2 and 3 bedroom units with a variety of spacious and thoughtfully designed floor plans. All units feature 10 inch textured ceilings, designer plank floors, high end light fixtures, oversized closets, ceiling fans in master bedrooms, granite counter tops, stainless steel appliances. stainless steel, full size washer/dryers and more. Top-notch amenities at the property include a resort-style pool, yoga lawn, and state-of-the-art 24-hour fitness center.

Located along the busy Ronald Reagan Parkway and US-27 logistics corridor, Indigo Champions Ridge provides residents with easy access to several popular retail, dining and entertainment destinations and many major area employers. , including Disney, Walmart, Amazon, Ford, FedEx, UPS and CVS. Additionally, the property is only 15 minutes from Disney World and Universal Orlando, approximately 30 minutes from downtown Orlando and Lakeland, and less than an hour from Tampa.

Adam Bieber of Bellwether Enterprise structured the joint venture between Middleburg and Stockbridge and the financing for the transaction, which was provided by Synovus Bank.

Those interested in renting a unit at Indigo Champions Ridge should call the rental office at (407) 723-7900 or email indigo@livemiddleburg.com. More information about the property is available by visiting www.indigochampions.com.

About Middleburg Communities:

Middleburg Communities is a fully integrated, multi-family development, investment, construction and management company operating in the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic United States. Since 2004, Middleburg has acquired and developed over 22,000 apartments, executing over $3 billion in transactions. The Middleburg team shares a vision for greater value creation through community impact. The company’s success is rooted in a genuine desire to serve its local communities in a thoughtful and holistic way. Middleburg encompasses people, property and partnerships to enhance the lives of others, contribute positively to its neighborhoods and maximize real returns for partners. For more information, please visit www.MiddleburgCommunities.com.

About Stockbridge

Stockbridge is a private property investment management firm led by seasoned industry professionals. The firm’s portfolio includes assets spanning the full spectrum of investment risk, including core, value-added and opportunistic strategies. Stockbridge and its affiliates have approximately $30.8 billion in assets under management (as of March 31, 2022) covering all major real estate property types and certain specialty property types in the United States. For more information, visit www.stockbridge.com.

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Regenerated site ready for two new communities https://wwirr.com/regenerated-site-ready-for-two-new-communities/ Sun, 17 Jul 2022 10:00:15 +0000 https://wwirr.com/regenerated-site-ready-for-two-new-communities/ As part of two major regeneration projects, leading homebuilder Harron Homes has started building nearly 300 new homes on recently acquired land in Doncaster and Harworth. Both sites are the product of major investment programs by Harworth Group PLC, one of the UK’s leading land and property regeneration companies. Harron Homes previously worked with Harworth […]]]>

As part of two major regeneration projects, leading homebuilder Harron Homes has started building nearly 300 new homes on recently acquired land in Doncaster and Harworth.

Both sites are the product of major investment programs by Harworth Group PLC, one of the UK’s leading land and property regeneration companies.

Harron Homes previously worked with Harworth Group at its Thoresby Vale site in Edwinstowe, where Harron has built 143 homes surrounded by beautiful views of Sherwood Forest.

As two of the largest sites in Harworth Group’s portfolio, Simpson Park and Riverdale Park look poised to offer valuable opportunities for the development of retail, residential, commercial, employment, leisure and green infrastructure.

Simpson Park is located on the former site of Harworth Colliery in Harworth, Nottinghamshire, where the colliery operated for over 80 years before being decommissioned in 2002 and demolished in 2016. The site name was chosen to respectfully commemorate the world famous cyclist. , Tom Simpson.

Local to the area, Tom Simpson was a champion cyclist who sadly died climbing Mont Ventouz in the 1967 Tour de France.

The Harron Homes development area constitutes 13 acres, where they have started building 132 of their high specification properties. There are plans to expand a nearby primary school to serve the development, and other amenities will be available on site, such as a family-run tavern and restaurant and extensive open public green spaces. Less than 30 minutes drive from Worksop and Doncaster, the area is approximately one mile north of Junction 34 of the A1(M), providing access to the larger motorway network.

Riverdale Park, located in Doncaster, South Yorkshire, has been regenerated from the former site of the McCormick tractor factory. Harron Homes has acquired the adjacent riverfront land, where 139 new homes are positioned along the river frontage, ideal for enjoyable waterside living. The area has excellent access to the M1, A1 and M18 motorways and is less than an hour from Leeds and Rotherham. The development will also benefit from the proposed commercial infrastructure, several facilities of which have already been constructed.

Nick Hague, Land Director of Harron Homes, says: “At these two new sites, we are creating a host of new homes in truly idyllic locations rich in cultural history. We have had a great relationship with Harworth Group in the past and are delighted to be working with them again. The regeneration programs they are known for really boost these areas and pave the way for the establishment of vibrant new communities. We are very pleased with the work we have done so far and look forward to developing these two popular housing locations.

Ed Catchpole, Regional Manager for Yorkshire and Central at Harworth, said: “Harron Homes is a valued and trusted partner to Harworth, with experience building high quality homes. We are excited to work with them again at Simpson Park and Riverdale Park, where they will help us create vibrant, sustainable communities where people want to live and work.

For more information about Harron Homes, please visit www.harronhomes.com.

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